Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 11:00 AM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Nearly 40% of the total U.S. energy consumption in 2012 was consumed in residential and commercial buildings, as recorded by U.S. Energy Information Administration. With the urgent need to reduce overall energy consumption in the U.S., many efforts are made to improve the energy efficiency of buildings. However, energy managers identify budget constraints as one of the main obstacles in improving the energy efficiency of buildings. Hence this study focuses on a cost benefit analysis of improving the energy efficiency, with a special focus on fitness facilities in college environments. As a case study, the author focuses on improving the energy efficiency of the fitness facility at Colby College, ME. The author first understands the energy consumption of the current facility, benchmarks energy consumption of the improved facilty, evaluates the energy conservation measures for improved facility through life cycle costing; and depicts the effect of net present positive projects on energy baseline of existing and improved facilities. Retrofitting Heating, Ventilation, Air Condition (HVAC) and lighting systems, replacing the original appliances with energy efficient equipment and improving the building envelope are methods considered in improving energy efficiency. As economic costs, the author takes into account the installation costs, operating costs and payback periods of the methods. As economic benefits, the author accounts the cost savings from improved energy consumption and environmental benefits such as the reduction of green house gas emissions.

Faculty Sponsor

Sahan Dissanayake

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Economics Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

872

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May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 11:00 AM

Cost Benefit Analysis of Improving the Energy Efficiency of a Fitness Facility

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Nearly 40% of the total U.S. energy consumption in 2012 was consumed in residential and commercial buildings, as recorded by U.S. Energy Information Administration. With the urgent need to reduce overall energy consumption in the U.S., many efforts are made to improve the energy efficiency of buildings. However, energy managers identify budget constraints as one of the main obstacles in improving the energy efficiency of buildings. Hence this study focuses on a cost benefit analysis of improving the energy efficiency, with a special focus on fitness facilities in college environments. As a case study, the author focuses on improving the energy efficiency of the fitness facility at Colby College, ME. The author first understands the energy consumption of the current facility, benchmarks energy consumption of the improved facilty, evaluates the energy conservation measures for improved facility through life cycle costing; and depicts the effect of net present positive projects on energy baseline of existing and improved facilities. Retrofitting Heating, Ventilation, Air Condition (HVAC) and lighting systems, replacing the original appliances with energy efficient equipment and improving the building envelope are methods considered in improving energy efficiency. As economic costs, the author takes into account the installation costs, operating costs and payback periods of the methods. As economic benefits, the author accounts the cost savings from improved energy consumption and environmental benefits such as the reduction of green house gas emissions.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/179