Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 11:00 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

Human activities that add nitrogen to the environment are dramatically affecting the nitrogen cycle. Advancements in the production of reactive nitrogen in the 1950s rapidly increased the production of nitrogen fertilizers used in agricultural food production, a significant source of nitrogen in the cycle. Increased crop yields have been tied to the rapidly ascending human population and associated environmental impacts, and the alteration of the nitrogen cycle itself is associated with documented environmental detriment. A review of the history of ascending anthropogenic nitrogen production in agricultural and industrial processes also reveals its role in negatively altering greenhouse gas levels, spreading infectious diseases, and promoting global inequalities. Documented illnesses associated with nitrogen-polluted water supplies, evidence of increased infectious disease in subtropical and tropical climates stemming from anthropogenic nitrogen, data the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has assembled, and the 2013 explosion at the West Fertilizer Plan in Texas are reviewed and demonstrate nitrogens effect on public health.

Faculty Sponsor

Russ Cole

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

781

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May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 11:00 AM

The Effects of Anthropogenic Nitrogen on Public Health

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Human activities that add nitrogen to the environment are dramatically affecting the nitrogen cycle. Advancements in the production of reactive nitrogen in the 1950s rapidly increased the production of nitrogen fertilizers used in agricultural food production, a significant source of nitrogen in the cycle. Increased crop yields have been tied to the rapidly ascending human population and associated environmental impacts, and the alteration of the nitrogen cycle itself is associated with documented environmental detriment. A review of the history of ascending anthropogenic nitrogen production in agricultural and industrial processes also reveals its role in negatively altering greenhouse gas levels, spreading infectious diseases, and promoting global inequalities. Documented illnesses associated with nitrogen-polluted water supplies, evidence of increased infectious disease in subtropical and tropical climates stemming from anthropogenic nitrogen, data the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has assembled, and the 2013 explosion at the West Fertilizer Plan in Texas are reviewed and demonstrate nitrogens effect on public health.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/173