Event Title

Anthropomorphism and Emotion Interactions

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 2:00 PM

Project Type

Poster

Description

The present experiment tested how anthropomorphism and emotion affect prosocial behavior in humans. Undergraduate students were randomly assigned to view one of six possible pictures, which contained one of three sayings, aimed to elicit specific emotions (guilt, shame, positive) and featured a certain object (anthropomorphized or not). Both stimuli were presented as the individual participated in a charitable task. It was predicted that individuals who were shown the anthropomorphized object in combination with words that elicited guilt or shame would spend the most time participating in the charitable task, while those placed in conditions meant to provoke positive emotions would not spend as much time as participants in other conditions. After participants decided they were done with the task presented to them, they were given a PANAS survey to complete, which served as a manipulation check.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Psychology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

879

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May 1st, 1:00 PM May 1st, 2:00 PM

Anthropomorphism and Emotion Interactions

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

The present experiment tested how anthropomorphism and emotion affect prosocial behavior in humans. Undergraduate students were randomly assigned to view one of six possible pictures, which contained one of three sayings, aimed to elicit specific emotions (guilt, shame, positive) and featured a certain object (anthropomorphized or not). Both stimuli were presented as the individual participated in a charitable task. It was predicted that individuals who were shown the anthropomorphized object in combination with words that elicited guilt or shame would spend the most time participating in the charitable task, while those placed in conditions meant to provoke positive emotions would not spend as much time as participants in other conditions. After participants decided they were done with the task presented to them, they were given a PANAS survey to complete, which served as a manipulation check.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/17