Event Title

Adaptive Capacity of Soft-shell Clam Co-management in Maine

Presenter Information

Grace O'Connor, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 122

Start Date

1-5-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 4:00 PM

Project Type

Presentation- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Soft-shell clams have historically been one of the most valuable fisheries in Maine, yet this fishery is currently at great risk due to the growing threat of invasive European green crab (Carcinus maenas) predation. Soft-shell clam management in Maine is unique in that it is co-managed at the municipal level with state and federal oversight. This research examines how the Maine soft-shell clam fishery adheres to the principles of co-management and looks to see if this management structure has the capacity to adapt to future threats, such as the threat of green crabs. We compare the successes of state managed and municipal managed clam flats and examine if there are strategies unique to co-management that allow certain towns to be more successful and better suited to deal with green crab predation. Finally, we examine if there are lessons from the soft-shell clam fishery that can be applied to other fisheries.

Faculty Sponsor

Russ Cole

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

228

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May 1st, 1:00 PM May 1st, 4:00 PM

Adaptive Capacity of Soft-shell Clam Co-management in Maine

Diamond 122

Soft-shell clams have historically been one of the most valuable fisheries in Maine, yet this fishery is currently at great risk due to the growing threat of invasive European green crab (Carcinus maenas) predation. Soft-shell clam management in Maine is unique in that it is co-managed at the municipal level with state and federal oversight. This research examines how the Maine soft-shell clam fishery adheres to the principles of co-management and looks to see if this management structure has the capacity to adapt to future threats, such as the threat of green crabs. We compare the successes of state managed and municipal managed clam flats and examine if there are strategies unique to co-management that allow certain towns to be more successful and better suited to deal with green crab predation. Finally, we examine if there are lessons from the soft-shell clam fishery that can be applied to other fisheries.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/166