Event Title

Developmental Gene Interactions in the Patterning of Genitalia in Jadera haematoloma

Presenter Information

Emily Jamieson, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 153

Start Date

1-5-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 2:50 PM

Project Type

Presentation

Description

Genitalia are an important area of study in entomology, because they are responsible for egg laying and may be involved in reproductive isolation. These structures exhibit sexual dimorphism as well as rapid evolution, and arise from multiple body segments. Despite their importance, there has been limited research into the genitalia of insects, specifically the gene interactions responsible for patterning their development. This study examines the functions and interactions of three well-studied appendage-patterning genes (Distal-less, homothorax and dachshund) in the red-shouldered soapberry bug Jadera haematoloma with comparisons to the milkweed bud Oncopeltus fasciatus. Despite being distantly related, males of O. fasciatus and J. haematoloma have anatomically similar genital capsules consisting of external gonocoxopodites and claspers, and internal parameres. However, O. fasciatus females exist with a multi-jointed, subterminal ovipositor, while the ovipositor of J. haematoloma is reduced on unjointed plates. Suppression of gene function during juvenile stages was accomplished using RNA intereference, allowing inference of gene function during development in these species. Gene expression levels were measured using realtime PCR to determine gene interactions in each sex. The results highlight the importance of interactions among specific appendage patterning genes in the development of diverse anatomical structures.

Faculty Sponsor

Cathy Bevier

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Biology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

816

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May 1st, 1:00 PM May 1st, 2:50 PM

Developmental Gene Interactions in the Patterning of Genitalia in Jadera haematoloma

Diamond 153

Genitalia are an important area of study in entomology, because they are responsible for egg laying and may be involved in reproductive isolation. These structures exhibit sexual dimorphism as well as rapid evolution, and arise from multiple body segments. Despite their importance, there has been limited research into the genitalia of insects, specifically the gene interactions responsible for patterning their development. This study examines the functions and interactions of three well-studied appendage-patterning genes (Distal-less, homothorax and dachshund) in the red-shouldered soapberry bug Jadera haematoloma with comparisons to the milkweed bud Oncopeltus fasciatus. Despite being distantly related, males of O. fasciatus and J. haematoloma have anatomically similar genital capsules consisting of external gonocoxopodites and claspers, and internal parameres. However, O. fasciatus females exist with a multi-jointed, subterminal ovipositor, while the ovipositor of J. haematoloma is reduced on unjointed plates. Suppression of gene function during juvenile stages was accomplished using RNA intereference, allowing inference of gene function during development in these species. Gene expression levels were measured using realtime PCR to determine gene interactions in each sex. The results highlight the importance of interactions among specific appendage patterning genes in the development of diverse anatomical structures.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/160