Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

Maine has several freshwater snails but one is found only within the state, a type of pond snail called Stagnicola mighelsi. Previous work shows that it has been lost at half of the lakes in its Fish River Lakes stronghold, and that it survives only in very big and remote lakes. However, there are 100 year-old reports from other watersheds, and possibly undiscovered populations. Learning about this snail and the other snails we will identify can help us protect a special part of Maines wildlife, and learn about the health of our lakes and rivers. Few people know or care about the survival of these animals - even though they help to keep lakes clear of algae and are important in the wildlife food chain. Our goal was to find the complete range of this snail, and to find out what environmental factors are correlated with surviving populations. We checked 8 lakes and rivers, identified all of their freshwater snails, and reported on water chemistry and lakeshore development. We used the crowdsourcing website experiment.com to fund our project. We are grateful to the Colby Biology Department for their donation to this project!

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Biology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

876

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

Discovering Maine's Own Freshwater Snail

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Maine has several freshwater snails but one is found only within the state, a type of pond snail called Stagnicola mighelsi. Previous work shows that it has been lost at half of the lakes in its Fish River Lakes stronghold, and that it survives only in very big and remote lakes. However, there are 100 year-old reports from other watersheds, and possibly undiscovered populations. Learning about this snail and the other snails we will identify can help us protect a special part of Maines wildlife, and learn about the health of our lakes and rivers. Few people know or care about the survival of these animals - even though they help to keep lakes clear of algae and are important in the wildlife food chain. Our goal was to find the complete range of this snail, and to find out what environmental factors are correlated with surviving populations. We checked 8 lakes and rivers, identified all of their freshwater snails, and reported on water chemistry and lakeshore development. We used the crowdsourcing website experiment.com to fund our project. We are grateful to the Colby Biology Department for their donation to this project!

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/143