Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

The coral reefs in the Caribbean Sea are declining at an alarming rate. This is due to a variety of factors including increased coastal development and pollution as well as effects of climate change, overfishing, and disease. Using ArcGIS ArcMap 10.1 software and Landsat data sets, the abundance of these reefs are tracked using Landsat 7 data from 2002 and Landsat 8 data from 2011. This study will use image classification to identify the Looe key reef (24.55⁰, -81.40⁰) and the Molasses reef (25.00⁰, -80.42⁰) in the Florida Keys, USA. The aim of this study is to explore the difference between Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 data scenes when identifying underwater structures, such as coral reefs. Developing methods to use Landsat data to track coral reefs could ultimately contribute to oceanic research and allow future tracking of threatened coral reef ecosystems.

Faculty Sponsor

Manny Gimond

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

524

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

Image classification of Looe key reef and Molasses reef using Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 data in the Florida Keys, USA

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

The coral reefs in the Caribbean Sea are declining at an alarming rate. This is due to a variety of factors including increased coastal development and pollution as well as effects of climate change, overfishing, and disease. Using ArcGIS ArcMap 10.1 software and Landsat data sets, the abundance of these reefs are tracked using Landsat 7 data from 2002 and Landsat 8 data from 2011. This study will use image classification to identify the Looe key reef (24.55⁰, -81.40⁰) and the Molasses reef (25.00⁰, -80.42⁰) in the Florida Keys, USA. The aim of this study is to explore the difference between Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 data scenes when identifying underwater structures, such as coral reefs. Developing methods to use Landsat data to track coral reefs could ultimately contribute to oceanic research and allow future tracking of threatened coral reef ecosystems.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/140