Event Title

Discoveries and Inventions: Battles over Accreditation and Patents

Location

Diamond 146

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 11:30 AM

Project Type

Presentation

Description

Who really invented the telephone? This and many other questions are formed throughout history that leaves us wondering where certain inventions that shaped our lives originated. Inventors must go through a long process in order to make their million-dollar creation patented. The U.S. patent states the rights of inventors and prevents others from claiming ownership of someone elses invention. Even though a patent confirms the claim of who created the invention, this person may have not been the first to bring up the idea. So who did first come up with the idea of the telephone?Watson and Crick are leaders in science as they discovered the structure of deoxyribonucleic acid, also known as DNA; however, there was one scientist by the name of Rosalind Franklin who never received recognition for her help until many years later. Watson and Crick even won a Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine, while Franklin was left out yet again for the prize since the winners must be alive when awarded. There are also other cases in history involving credibility or U.S. patents, including the founding fathers to major inventions that shaped many peoples lifestyles. Was it Thomas Edison to bring the first light bulb, or did Nicola Tesla have more to do with it? Alexander Graham Bell was credited for inventing the telephone in 1876 by receiving a U.S. patent, yet he may have not been the first to create the idea. There are many reasons why certain people were credited, but why were those who made a massive contribution not recognized until much later in life, or after death? To create an invention or discover something that will move society forward deserves accreditation, yet all those deserving should not have to wait to finally be recognized.

Faculty Sponsor

Elizabeth Ketner

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. English Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Humanities

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

610

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May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 11:30 AM

Discoveries and Inventions: Battles over Accreditation and Patents

Diamond 146

Who really invented the telephone? This and many other questions are formed throughout history that leaves us wondering where certain inventions that shaped our lives originated. Inventors must go through a long process in order to make their million-dollar creation patented. The U.S. patent states the rights of inventors and prevents others from claiming ownership of someone elses invention. Even though a patent confirms the claim of who created the invention, this person may have not been the first to bring up the idea. So who did first come up with the idea of the telephone?Watson and Crick are leaders in science as they discovered the structure of deoxyribonucleic acid, also known as DNA; however, there was one scientist by the name of Rosalind Franklin who never received recognition for her help until many years later. Watson and Crick even won a Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine, while Franklin was left out yet again for the prize since the winners must be alive when awarded. There are also other cases in history involving credibility or U.S. patents, including the founding fathers to major inventions that shaped many peoples lifestyles. Was it Thomas Edison to bring the first light bulb, or did Nicola Tesla have more to do with it? Alexander Graham Bell was credited for inventing the telephone in 1876 by receiving a U.S. patent, yet he may have not been the first to create the idea. There are many reasons why certain people were credited, but why were those who made a massive contribution not recognized until much later in life, or after death? To create an invention or discover something that will move society forward deserves accreditation, yet all those deserving should not have to wait to finally be recognized.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/135