Event Title

Hollywood and the Third Reich

Presenter Information

David Thomas, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 223

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

Project Type

Presentation- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

In January of 1933, Adolf Hitler became the Chancellor of Germany. From that point onwards Hitler and the Nazi Party continuously gained power and influence in all aspects of German life, making Hitler one of the most powerful men in the world. Many historic events occurred during his brief but dynamic reign as the ruler of Germany. These events included Hitlers withdrawal from the League of Nations in October of 1933, the 1936 Summer Olympics which were held in Berlin, the Night of the Broken Glass in 1938 and the start of World War II in 1939 with the German invasion of Poland. Literally thousands of books have been written on World War II and Hitler. Moreover, much has been written concerning Nazi propaganda in Germany during World War II and the events leading up to this conflict. From many primary sources from after late 1941, when the United States officially became an active participant in the conflict, it becomes clear that the Third Reich was portrayed in very negative light in the American media. Little has been written, however, concerning the American media and the Hollywood portrayal of Hitler and Nazi Germany from 1933 to late 1941. This is rather surprising since there are many Hollywood primary sources form this time period that deal directly with Nazism in both written texts and in film. An analysis of how Nazi Germany was portrayed in Hollywood during events such Germanys withdrawal from the League of Nations, the 1936 Summer Olympics, and other aforementioned events can reveal how the United States generally felt about Nazi Germany and if, and how, Americans were being prepared for eventual war with Germany. Was Hollywood issuing warnings about the coming storm? Or did Hollywood embrace the larger isolationist sentiments that had engulfed the United States?

Faculty Sponsor

Raffael Scheck

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. History Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

136

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May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Hollywood and the Third Reich

Diamond 223

In January of 1933, Adolf Hitler became the Chancellor of Germany. From that point onwards Hitler and the Nazi Party continuously gained power and influence in all aspects of German life, making Hitler one of the most powerful men in the world. Many historic events occurred during his brief but dynamic reign as the ruler of Germany. These events included Hitlers withdrawal from the League of Nations in October of 1933, the 1936 Summer Olympics which were held in Berlin, the Night of the Broken Glass in 1938 and the start of World War II in 1939 with the German invasion of Poland. Literally thousands of books have been written on World War II and Hitler. Moreover, much has been written concerning Nazi propaganda in Germany during World War II and the events leading up to this conflict. From many primary sources from after late 1941, when the United States officially became an active participant in the conflict, it becomes clear that the Third Reich was portrayed in very negative light in the American media. Little has been written, however, concerning the American media and the Hollywood portrayal of Hitler and Nazi Germany from 1933 to late 1941. This is rather surprising since there are many Hollywood primary sources form this time period that deal directly with Nazism in both written texts and in film. An analysis of how Nazi Germany was portrayed in Hollywood during events such Germanys withdrawal from the League of Nations, the 1936 Summer Olympics, and other aforementioned events can reveal how the United States generally felt about Nazi Germany and if, and how, Americans were being prepared for eventual war with Germany. Was Hollywood issuing warnings about the coming storm? Or did Hollywood embrace the larger isolationist sentiments that had engulfed the United States?

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/125