Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 11:00 AM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Due to their vital contributions to the stability of coastal habitats and human health, mangrove deforestation and habitat loss is one of the most pressing environmental issues in tropical and subtropical regions. Mangroves, on the surface, are important for limiting storm damage and preventing erosion. Tropical marshes and estuaries formed and sustained by the dense web of mangrove roots create a hugely biodiverse habitat which acts as a breeding ground and nursery for countless species. In addition they are effective filters of sediment and nutrients (Wolf 2012). Mangrove species are also a large above-ground carbon sink (Blanco, et al. 2012). Collectively, the ecosystem services provided by mangroves worldwide is estimated at 1.65 trillion dollars annually (Wolf 2012). These mangrove ecosystems and the services they provide are being severely threatened by anthropogenic changes. Some of the anthropogenic threats to mangroves include extraction for uses as timber, coastal pollution, reclamation of land for human use, and the effects of climate change on these ecosystems. Deforestation due to reclamation of coastal land is one of most pressing threats to mangroves, and recently, this reclamation has been attributed to development associated with tourism (Ellison and Farnsworth 1996). Developments of impermeable materials in coastal communities can also cause freshwater shortages by effectively damming limited freshwater sources (Bonaire National Marine Park) and limiting flooding in mangrove ecosystems, which is necessary for seedling dispersal (Rubin, et al. 1999). Specifically in the caribbean, the degradation of mangroves threatens the wellbeing of countless species.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

540

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May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 11:00 AM

Examining Anthropogenic Threats to Caribbean Mangrove Habitats

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Due to their vital contributions to the stability of coastal habitats and human health, mangrove deforestation and habitat loss is one of the most pressing environmental issues in tropical and subtropical regions. Mangroves, on the surface, are important for limiting storm damage and preventing erosion. Tropical marshes and estuaries formed and sustained by the dense web of mangrove roots create a hugely biodiverse habitat which acts as a breeding ground and nursery for countless species. In addition they are effective filters of sediment and nutrients (Wolf 2012). Mangrove species are also a large above-ground carbon sink (Blanco, et al. 2012). Collectively, the ecosystem services provided by mangroves worldwide is estimated at 1.65 trillion dollars annually (Wolf 2012). These mangrove ecosystems and the services they provide are being severely threatened by anthropogenic changes. Some of the anthropogenic threats to mangroves include extraction for uses as timber, coastal pollution, reclamation of land for human use, and the effects of climate change on these ecosystems. Deforestation due to reclamation of coastal land is one of most pressing threats to mangroves, and recently, this reclamation has been attributed to development associated with tourism (Ellison and Farnsworth 1996). Developments of impermeable materials in coastal communities can also cause freshwater shortages by effectively damming limited freshwater sources (Bonaire National Marine Park) and limiting flooding in mangrove ecosystems, which is necessary for seedling dispersal (Rubin, et al. 1999). Specifically in the caribbean, the degradation of mangroves threatens the wellbeing of countless species.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/107